As Curator of TEDxKazimierz I know that the process by which we allocate tickets is a source of many questions, much special pleading and miscomprehension. This post explains What we do and why we do it, and gives tips for those who are keen to improve their chances of getting a ticket.
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2015 TEDxKazimierz Team on Stage

I regret the fact that not everyone who wants to attend can come. In an ideal world we would have unlimited capacity but our wonderful venue has limited capacity (about 230 seats in all).

We will have a  live stream, and we upload talks onto the TEDx Channel on Youtube.

The idea of audience curation in general is explained in the TEDx Organiser guidelines.
Because we cannot give tickets to everyone we  allocate tickets according to some rules and on the basis of information provided in the application form.   The form is the vital part of our audience curation process – before filling in the form please read these instructions. here is our FAQ
1. Why do I need to apply ?
The TEDxKazimierz team and our speakers have invested a huge amount of time for free to make a wonderful event. We want precious places at the event to go to people who we believe will contribute the most on the day – and do the most with the experience and ideas we give them.  We want people who commit to being positive and making a contribution, who will spread the word about what we do, use the talks and inspiration in their work and community, and who can persuade us that if they make a promise in their application they will keep it.

Continue reading

May 2016

“Hi Richard,

can we grab a coffee – I love to get your feedback on my business idea to do X in Y –  and show you my awesome product.

I believe it is really great, and is going to be huge.

We urgently need a small investment of $100K due to our first customers being late in deciding to buy/ to keep us going as we get close to going global. It’s a billion dollar market.

We must talk soon, or you’ll miss out. I’ll be able to slot you in next week.

bests
Joe Doe
Co-Interplanetary Awesomeness Officer and Founder
Creepaability-aka-dontknowthefuckwhatthisisallabout.com ”


I get a version of this  kind of note  from time to time.  I have taken the worst bits from different e-mails and messages I receive  to make something truly awful. I hope this post encourages those who write to investors to reflect on their approach. 
This post tells your  what I think and feel, and what I write back (not the same) , and offers some reflections.

What I think and feel
0. not again.. 🙁

1. Coffees are for drinking – not grabbing. Grabbing is rude,  and you might spill it.
2. I don’t care what I or you think about your product. I care about the problem it solves, and what customers and potential customers/users think.
3. If you urgently need money, you are bad at planning. Of course businesses, people, and startups can and will run out of cash,  but if you don’t realise this sounds terrible, you are probably not smart enough to be my partner.
4. $100K is not a small amount of money.  I was well paid when I earned $1500 month net in my best paid job (25 years ago). I took so big pay cut when I started my first business I was effectively paying for the privilege of working.   It could have taken me 10 years to save $100K. If you think $100K is a small amount, I don’t really trust you to spend it carefully.
5. Blaming customers for being late sounds like a stupid attitude.  If they haven’t bought anything you should not be calling them customers anyway.

6. Money should be for specific actions, not “keeping us going”.

7. Going global makes sense once you have a proven product that clients love. You offer no evidence of that so far.

8. What is the billion dollar market?

9.  Don’t rush me. Giving me the impression I’ll have to adjust to your busy life makes me annoyed before I’ve even met you.

10. Silly job titles repel me.

11. If I invite him/her to Open Coffee Kraków they will probably tell me it’s too early in the morning and I’ll never hear from them
again.:-) That is probably a good outcome.

12. I respect and admire entrepreneurs who hustle  – so I will try (hard) to be nice.


What I write 

Dear Chief Awesomeness Officer,

Thanks very much for approaching me.

Best is to come to Open Coffee Krakow  and we can chat after that if you are in town.

I trust that you are OK with open feedback and if there are things about your idea I don’t like you’ll want me to tell you.
Please confirm.

Do send me a Linkedin invite so you can see more about me and vice versa.

Please answer the questions in this blog post I wrote a few years ago –  so that I can be more helpful to you during the meeting (if we decide to meet)

Tell me how you are going to make money, what you would spend my investment money on, and what you are offering me in return.

It doesn’t matter much what I think  about your idea.
What really matters is:
what clients and potential clients think about your idea.
what pressing problem you think you are solving.
what your costs will be.
how many months you can survive before you run out of money in the worst case scenario.

Good luck and see you next Open Coffee Krakow. (if you cannot join in person, we are on Facebook Live.)

Richard

Reflections

A lot of inexperienced entrepreneurs have read an article somewhere full of “fake it till you make it” type BS and imagine that a stupid angel can be duped into handing over money. It’s seldom true, and it’s not a great way to approach me. I’ve made lots of mistakes and am not that smart  – but I don’t like being patronised.

It’s important to think and reflect before sharing my feelings. I may be annoyed and angry, but I really want to help entrepreneurs. I’ll try to help the guy learn. Maybe I was like that once.

Getting their Linkedin details enables me to figure out what sort of history they have.  Past actions (and inactions) give a great insights into someone’s potential).

Maybe there are people out there who respond well to crappy messages like the one I am dissing ?  If anyone reading this found an investor this way,  I would love to stand corrected. The beauty of a free society is that there is more than one way of operating.

May 2016

Mateusz Paszkiewicz lecture at Social Media Thursday in Białystok photo Paweł Tadejko-2

Mateusz Paszkiewicz lecture at Social Media Thursday in Białystok

I tracked down Mateusz as a result of my search for Snapchat experts. He made clear that Snapchat is not his “only thing” but this interview is focussed on Snapchat. My questions in bold

Please describe what Snapchat is and is becoming to someone who has not really got the concept yet

Snapchat is a 100% mobile application which is very specific. Content which we publish disappears after it was watched, read or published on MyStory (in 24 h) It’s a place where people communicate mostly by photos and videos, in a very creative ways (filters, special effects, drawings).

You can communicate directly with people (personal message, chat, video/audio call), show your stuff to everybody by publishing content on stories, watching Live Stories from events or different places or consuming high quality content made by Publishers on Discovery (Mashable, BBC, MTV, National Geographic and more).

Snapchat is very innovative, constantly growing and reaching more adults. Bigger players like Facebook are copying some of it features (QR Codes, Slingshot, poke, self-destructing messages in Messenger)

Why do you think it is experiencing such growth, to start with people said it’s for teenagers who want to be somewhere their parents are not. but is this still true?

Most of new platforms have started from youngsters (Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, MySpace). Somewhat it’s a natural cycle, young people have time and want to experiment, check new places build their own world far away from parents, teachers and other relatives.

I think that youngsters feel very comfortable with “disappearing content”.

Snapchat also provides very creative tools: you can draw, put emojis and stickers, put some filters, make face change with your buddy or with a person from the photo – isn’t that cool?

If you look on youngsters world it is very dominated by smartphones and this is 100% mobile app, which take whole screen of your mobile device.

And why Snapchat is experiencing such a growth? It’s a hard question because I believe that there are no simple answers. For me Snapchat has put some innovation on the market in terms of mobile (photo/video) app world, go 100% in vertical, experiment with new stuff, 100% mobile. I think it fits well to new generation.

On the other hand demography of Snapchat user is growing so it’s only a matter of time when more and more adults wills start using this app.

The “wake up call” is often discovering that a major rival or competitor is establishing a following on Snapchat. How easy is it to find your competitors and business partners on Snapchat ? What are the simplest rules and tools?

You have to see it outside Snapchat on other social channels because if you don’t know account name of the brand, you won’t find it.

Now is a very good time to bring your brand to Snapchat.. Figure out your communication on that channel, think if your target audience is there. Do you know what kind of stories you want to tell people via Snapchat and would they be valuable for your audience.

If your answer is “yes” then get stuck in: there is a lot to win. Many brands are waiting for “perfect moment” where they will have advanced analytics and some gurus will tell you – okay it’s safe now, you should go there, it’s working! But then you will miss a lot of opportunity to steal a march on your competitors, user engagement and interaction.

Actually people really care about stuff that you are posting, they are looking at stories, adding new accounts, checking it out. But nothing lasts forever, especially user attention. I remember some years ago how many people in Poland liked everything on Facebook, you wrote “I need 300 people to reach 10 000 likes on my page, please help” or how many new people we add to our friends – people use to do that.

If you try do it now, it’s very different. The platform changed, we changed, our level of excitement went down, and we are much more selective. That’s why watching the market for attention, and knowing when to go with something new is important.

What kind of benefits do companies and individuals derive from establishing a good Snapchat presence. What are the challenges when analyzing competitors’ Snapchat presence. How do you go about it?

Snapchat is a platform where you can bond much more deeply with your community than on other channels.

Second, people are spending a lot of their time there. It’s fresh, new, there is still a big field to do something as a first or create your own way/style. The two biggest assets of Snapchat are user engagement and attention – things that marketers are struggling for every day.

I don’t think that Snapchat will dominate other communication channels, but it will be a great one to provide a different way of communication, Closer & more creative and authentic (even if you use mask filters, you can’t prepare your content before).

I think that biggest challenge is to know how many people saw the stories of your competitors. Some big brands making the mistake of chasing numbers by hiring influencers to make stories for them. This makes a spike in interest, but after that nothing happens on their Snapchat channel or it is simply weak, because the marketing team behind it doesn’t have any idea for consistent communication. It’s a huge waste of money unless part of an integrated plan.

Making an impressive Snapchat video is a bit of a challenge for a Snapchat “newbie”. If he or she is not there in a professional capacity, it doesn’t matter so much as it temporary. but if you are a personal brand, or a company, then it’s a stress, a little like Periscope. What are the options ?

Yes, you are right. A lot of marketers or people who are celebrities are afraid of new things, don’t have too much time or are just romantic about their old channels and don’t see need to be at the front.

For a serious brand or personal brand it is good to contact person who is a specialist (like me ) Should they be on Snapchat at all (is their target audience there, or will they be soon), if yes, They should learn the mechanism the DNA of the platform or find someone to teach them.

A lot of people are stressed with live content (Periscope, Facebook Live) and I respect that, it’s not for everybody. With Snapchat you always decide if you want to publish photo, video or drawing after you made it. A disaster does not have to on line.

There are few tips for personal brands:

– contact with somebody who has practical knowledge about Snapchat

– check the most famous Snapchat users, see how they are using this channel

– experiment, see what works for you the most, how you feel with it, do you want to do it

– set your goals and discuss with experienced professionals

Brands:

– contact with somebody who have practical knowledge about Snapchat

– is your target audience on Snapchat ?

– what value you want to provide – fun, education, ‘behind the scenes’ stories. Other…?

– think and decide how Snapchat can be part of your communication strategy

– set your goals and discuss with experienced professionals

– review what resources do you have. Can you sustain regular content?

What are the dangers of an unprofessional Snapchat presence., it is better to have a fewer and higher quality or doing them daily even if not so well ?

That depends if you are a brand or a person. I mean from user perspective Snapchat is a platform which gave you a lot of flexibility, it’s not about perfection (that’s why probably a lot of people like it). It’s about moment in time, people use it to communicate with their friends.

From marketing perspective (brand). It’s not about perfection too, but about value. What interesting content you have for your existing and possibly new audiences. Why somebody should give you 30 seconds of their time to watch your stuff. For example if you are and operator for Formula1 Snapchat be where the action is: on the F1 Championship, make takeovers by top drivers, go to Pit Stop – just create your little show around it. Have a concept, but left a lot of space for flow and creativity.

The biggest mistake for brands is just – being boring, don’t have any concept or leaving your whole communication for few big and expensive shots with influencers. You put them on, make an impact– get many new followers – but then what? Consistent planned communication matters.

You just have to know how to use the energy of an influencer for your brand, not only for stats and numbers of followers. Think about building community around your consistent activity – not just around one show.

Mateusz at Marketing & Technology event in Poznan

How often does someone need to post a Story if they are going to be effective, and how much time does someone needs to devote to making a good Snapchat story?

It depends on what kind of brand are you, what is your target, how much resource you have. Ideally it is every day. For some brands it’s much easier to create content, others need to think more about the concept.

A good Snapchat story is not the most complicated or the one which takes most time.

Is the one that is most interesting for your community. It’s different for each branch, because it’s easier to create a good story from event, backstage, makeover then create a concept for specific day with specific content.

What are the key features of a good Snapchat story, and what mistakes do you see most often.

Good practice:

– idea

– be authentic

– creative – use different tools

– provide value – think about your community and their time

– be consistent

Mistakes

– publishing everything around you without thinking “ I’m going to work…. “ I’m making a coffee . here is my office..” might be interesting once if the theme is … my working day

– making snaps horizontal (if there is no need or idea around it)

– no idea/concept for your activity

Once someone has committed to Snapchat and the content is live, should they start promoting it right away, or wait until they it is achieving their objectives? Once they are ready for promotion, where should they do it?

That depends on the story. If the story will have sense from first or second snap I prefer to start it promoting right away. If you are creating stuff which need a one third, half of full story to make a sense I will create it ASAP and then start promoting it on different channels. It’s all about context for people who will join you and have the first impression.

If someone objects to making Snapchat content at considerable expense and seeing it disappear, what can they do to keep it alive on other channels.

Download it to your mobile as soon it will be ready or make print screens to put it on different channels. It all depends how you want to use it. After that you can upload it on Youtube, Facebook, Instagram or in other places.

How do you expect Snapchat marketing to evolve as Snapchat starts to monetize its traffic.

That depends what kind of features they will make live. But I think that next big steps will be opening advertisement panel for more countries (ads, Discover, more local Live Stories) sponsored filters, graphic effects and creating some cool features for brands to tell stories.

I think that Discover and Live Stories have much more power when they are put in context of specific country (geolocation). More people will care about Discover if they could check information close to where they are or are from. The same with Live Stories. So I see some interesting points in that.

One thing I’m sure of and I think the Snapchat team agree about is that you have to implement advertisement in the smart and not too commercial way. People don’t like attacked with advertising. It’s business of course, so that you have to balance it somehow and be smart.

Check out Mateusz’s web page here 

or his Linkedin Group for Snapchat Business

matpaszkiewicz.com

matpaszkiewicz.com

 

Richard Lucas April 2016

When I was approached by Toptal, a blue chip and highly successful outsourcing firm backed by top VCs to host a post from their blog, I speculated about how Kraków might look through the eyes of their community,

I know about Toptal from listening the the awesome Mixergy.com – a podcast by Andrew Warner where he does insightful interviews with successful entrepreneurs.. Toptal are a regular sponsor of his show. They provide top class developers to entrepreneurs, and solve the recruitment problem. From what I can tell Toptal  competes on quality rather than price.

So talented Toptal Developers and entrepreneurs, what can I tell you about Kraków Poland?  

It’s more than the top outsourcing destination in Europe.

Many global companies have put RnD centres here. If you want to know about investment opportunities, and potential sources of clients, check Krakow Silicon Valley – Why not talk by Ramon Tancinco of Cisco , the OMGKRK portal and its group on Facebook Aspire and Open Coffee Krakow

OMGKRK Facebook April 2016

Although Google for Entrepreneurs has moved a couple of hours north to Warsaw, T-Mobile’s Hub.raum and other co-working centres lead a very dynamic Startup scene, and every startup needs a CTO and development team.

“We did not come here for cheap labour”  said Wojtek Burkot – when Head of Engineering at Google Krakow, “we came for Talent”. With EY Entrepreneur of the Year competition winner, Codewise, Estimote – world leader in iBeacon tech, Brainly – a leader in social learning, and Base leader in Mobile CRM, Kraków is bursting with high profile startups. Azimo – valued in 2015 at US$100 million – is here too. Innovation Nest, led by Piotr Wilam – founder of Onet.pl Poland’s Google/Yahoo hybrid supports the startup community

There area plenty of opportunities, plus Krakow is reckoned to be one of the top places in Europe to live – and visit for tourists which dynamic nightlight, numerous restaurants, lovely old town as well as the booming economy.

Come on over – Toptal visitors. If you are an entrepreneur – it’s a serious place for business as well as a great place to live and work. If you are a freelance developer and want to be somewhere cool, relatively inexpensive and fun while working for global clients, Krakow is awesome from April-October. If you are looking for “cheap developers” it’s the wrong city.
Krakow is great value for money, a good place to find clients, investors, business partners,people and technology, but not cheap.
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by Richard Lucas March 2016

Most of the information in this article comes from an interview with Jenny Chen of WalktheChat  (details below). Thanks to her for sharing her time.

 

WeChat

WeChat is a leading mobile Chinese Social Media platform which combines the features of many of the most popular global social media and e-commerce platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and Skype.  As the name suggests –  the basic function is Chat but  users can also have a website, pay a bill, book a taxi, make a phone call (from January 2016 to landlines and mobiles), buy and sell, and play games. The mobile aspect is very important. For many users it is their gateway to the internet. Companies have official Wechat  accounts. Games are big in China, and a lot of their users are gamers. The last time WeChat published figures they had 650 million active monthly users.

WeChat is relevant for both B2C and  B2B businesses. Although it is primarily for the Chinese market, a lot of Chinese users living in other countries use it.  Users can use WeChat Wallet to transfer money among friends without transaction fees.  WeChat charges 0.6% transaction fee for businesses collecting money using WeChat payment.  For more detailed and impressive information about Wechat read here

A Wechat store can be set up for free, and as many users never leave WeChat this is pretty obvious move if you want to reach clients in China.

Five free and popular stores are  YouShop (微店)www.weidian.com/ Youzan (有赞/口袋通) http://youzan.com/ JD.COM (京东微店) Lewaimai 乐外卖 www.lewaimai.com/ and  VD (V店) http://www.vd.cn/ for full analysis of the features of each read an  excellent review here

Foreign brands can struggle to market on WeChat.  Great content is important.  Applying the same marketing strategy as on Facebook and Twitter accounts isn’t going to work.  Promotional content can easily leads users to unfollowing the WeChat account. Content has to be of direct benefit to users to be effective.  There are tremendous challenges to keep content relevant, brands should identify the main influencers among their readers, and give them access to VIP groups,  providing services like package tracking,  loyalty cards, and ordering systems to keep followers engaged and using the site. They should  target readers by gender,  geography and their reading preferences, they should  work on article design, using surveys to make sites more interactive and to better engage users. Sometimes it is better to build a presence on less competitive platforms and then migrate to WeChat later. more detail about this topic here

The Chinese market is one of the biggest in the world and highly competitive. As with other countries consumers appreciate value for money, high quality and keen prices. At the same time expensive wine in top venues in major cities can be over 10K Euro for a bottle. Big spenders still exist, even after the crisis.  For companies whose products are suitable for the Chinese market, a store on WeChat may well be part of their market entry strategy.

WalktheChat helps foreign companies establish their presence on Wechat.  It was was established Thomas Graziani,   a Frenchman living in Beijing, Jenny Chen joined the board shortly after.  WalktheChat has been effective in finding its own clients through content marketing, a high quality blog, a good website, and get found through SEO and Google searches. They also ran viral marketing campaigns on Wechat account which are highly effective. Their services are viewable here www.walkthechat.com

Check out Bohan.pl for more information about doing business in China

 

 

Richard Lucas March 2016

Introduction

Michal Kalina — former Social Media specialist at one of Krakow’s most dynamic seed funds Innovation Nest has been Snapchatting for a while during his travels. Now he’s showing backstage of creating his web&mobile development company Kolektiv.

The growth of Snapchat has been likened to that of Facebook in 2007/8. Gary Vaynerchuk has been really pushing Snapchat as being at a breakthrough moment., and high profile figures like podcaster Johnny Lee Dumas are paying attention as in this 26th February Gary V Show. 

For early adopters of emerging social media platforms, and marketing professionals who believe that there are land grab possibilities to get the best seats before the majority arrive, Snapchat is high on the agenda.  However, a developing a professional and coherent presence on Snapchat without spending a fortune is a challenge. I took the time to talk to Michał about his perspectives

Please describe what Snapchat is and is becoming to someone who has not really got the concept yet

Snapchat is a new wave social media platform for sharing videos and photos via smartphone. In previous years becomes popular among youngsters. Now used by celebrities, newspapers, brands & normal people to tell their everyday story –  often known as vlogging. According to Wikipedia, Snapchat has gone through 7 Billion daily video views in February this year  

Content is given in a more convenient way,  and is richer in emotions, than a tweet or post. It is a place where professionals can show the backstage to their work & brands expand their social engagement on a daily basis.

Why do you think it is experiencing such growth?  To start with people said it’s for teenagers who want to be somewhere their parents are not.. but is this still true?

Well, I think it was an important factor but just in a beginning. Most importantly Snapchat is the first platform that fixed the problem of mobile videos. Facebook, YouTube, not even Instagram have solved this problem. If you have seen a funny YouTube film called ‘Vertical Video Syndrome’ where the main character says ‘Say No to Vertical Videos’, now it’s out-of-date mostly because Snapchat existence. Snapchat means I say ‘Yes’ to vertical videos!

Another reason is that Snapchat democratized video editing. You don’t need to learn any special tool. Just record a video, add text or emoji & upload it. If you do it few times in a row, your film is done & already uploaded, it makes you feel brilliant. It’s fast, live & real. That’s how social media works nowadays – it catches the spirit of the times.

The “wake up call” to getting interested for professionals is discovering that a major rival or competitor is establishing a following on Snapchat. How easy is it to find your competitors and business partners on Snapchat ? What are the simplest rules and tools?

It’s for pioneers right now – that’s why it is the best time to get into this platform. Once it will be easy, that’s already too late. There are some agencies but we’re in early days. Check out:

http://vaynermedia.com/  https://naritiv.com/ http://www.grapestory.co/  It’s not 

What kind of benefits do companies and individuals derive from establishing a good Snapchat presence. What are the challenges when analysing competitors’ Snapchat presence. How do you go about it?

Attention –  In today’s world is extremely hard to get attention. We’re bombarded with content. Even if something is interesting for us, we put it aside to ‘watch later’… which of course we don’t get round to. One thing that’s unique for Snapchat is that users really consume content and give attention to what they’re watching because it expires after 24h. They won’t have a chance to watch it later.

There is no set standard in Snapchat strategies yet. Remember that your competitors are experimenting. If you start to copy their behaviour,  you’ll miss better format ideas that fit  your customers and brand. So follow them, be aware of what they do,  try to learn from  their mistakes, apply the best of their formats, but also experiment a lot with your own style.

Making an impressive Snapchat video is a bit of a challenge for a Snapchat “newbie”. If someone is experimenting as a private individuals it doesn’t matter if they make a bit of a fool of themselves.   It doesn’t matter that much, it is temporary. But …. if you are a personal brand, or a company, then it’s a stress, a little like Periscope. What are the options ?

If you don’t take a risk in this medium, you risk even more, because you are losing a chance. Don’t worry about making impressive videos, make real ones. It’s not Vimeo or YouTube. Snapchat is all about short, somewhat messy content. That is its beauty. Show your audience a real you/your brand and people will like you more and forgive you all mistakes.  If you want to outsource to professionals, we (Richard, Michał and our network of super talented Central European specialists) can probably help.  

For example: During my recent 4 months trip to India I showed the backstage of my trip by making short Snapchat videos. I used them to show the people I met, the challenges and adventures I had along the way etc. People who love  traveling got involved in my Snapchat stories because they could feel with me how it was to be a lonely traveller in exotic country. It’s was a compelling alternative to a travel blog.

For example: If you’re running a gym. Make a daily video with short exercises for today. Give your audience some tips how to make a good workout. Bring them value & you’ll attract your target group.

What are the dangers of an unprofessional Snapchat presence. Is it better to have a fewer and higher quality or be doing them daily? Here’s my warning of  what might  happen in your don’t know what you are doing

Snapchat users are much likely to watch amateur videos than a professional campaign but I don’t mean that as a CEO you should start Snapchatting from tomorrow, making yourself look fooling in front of staff, clients and competitors may not match your brand image.  It takes time to learn.  It’s good to get training before you post your first videos if you have a brand that might be damaged by something unprofessional. If you don’t want to do it yourself,  hire someone who understands the medium and has some demonstrated experience. Otherwise you may well fail, making unnatural, over long content.

How often does someone need to post a Story if they are going to be effective, and how much time does someone needs to devote to making a good Snapchat story?

You don’t necessarily need to do it daily. But at least 3 times a week is recommended. Otherwise your audience won’t get used to the idea that your stories are out there. If viewers like your stories, you’ll want to keep them nurtured, and in the habit of coming back.

There is no good answer for how much time you should spend on making stories. Some of my snaps took me 10 minutes to shoot, others hours of preparation –  2 hours of shooting – like this video I made about murals in Krakow. If your time is valuable it may be cheaper to work with someone so your involvement is minimized.

output_c7DBms

Another example this: 10 minutes of shooting, 9 months of preparations

Dangerous_Sneezing

or here

What are the key features of a good Snapchat story, and what mistakes do you see most often.

Be bold. Be short. Be simple. Play with text & visual effects. Use colors.

Don’t talk a lot. I made this mistake many times. I really wanted to explain everything & I recorded 5 videos with my face. That’s boring 🙁 .

Once someone has committed to Snapchat and the content is live, should they start promoting it right away, or wait until they are are it is achieving their objectives? Once they are ready for promotion, where should they do it?

I was experimenting with Snapchat since June 2015 & didn’t promote my content. I think my opinion is clear. I learnt how to use it & now I’m ready to promote my stories. If you have a professional social media team they will have multiple channles across which to promote your Snapchat. (Instagram, mailing list, Facebook, Twitter etc etc)

If someone objects to making Snapchat content at considerable expense and seeing it disappear, what can they do to keep it alive on other channels.

Well. You can make a collage with other materials. It is possible to upload your Snapchat content onto Youtube and Facebook if you know what you are doing.  Adidas did this with Karlie Kloss.

Or you can just simply upload your Snaps on YouTube & promote them. Here are some of mine.

Crazy pilgrims in India

https://youtu.be/POr5NiRAiow

The Highest Building on Earth & Me

https://youtu.be/CNw_AdXdCvM

The Best Drummer & Me On Stage

https://youtu.be/StWAZD-GhzM

How do you expect Snapchat marketing to evolve as Snapchat starts to monetize its traffic.

As a brand there will be even more ways to get attention but it will cost you money & effort Evan Spiegel(Snapchat CEO) told Bloomberg  They will put a lot of effort to make their ads as good as regular content if not  better. So don’t expect to put a low quality banner on Snapchat in the near future. It won’t work.

Remember. Be simple & authenic. That’s what matters on Snapchat.

You can reach me on Snapchat @MichalKalina or add here

Take photo with your Snapchat profile & see what happens.

Thanks a lot Michał

snapcode-blog

From my point of view – I’m 100% convinced of the value, and am assembling a team of people who know about Snapchat

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I am a Newbie. Do follow me but don’t expect Michał’s level of professionalism.

Posted on February 24, 2016

Richard Lucas

Towards the end of February 2015 I migrated this blog onto Richardlucas.com and posted “The Last Post” blog  where I wrote that it would be the last post ever on this blog (unless I changed my mind). Like a Zombie, this blog has come back to life.

zombie

I am not sure if I will post here again, but something is happening that might be of interest to WordPress bloggers. The stats for the old blog on WordPress are solid but not stellar   – around 1000 visitors a month on average. The most popular post by far being Letter to a new business partner  which still get 20-40 views a day.

Traffic on the old richardhlucas.wordpress.com blog

Traffic on the old richardhlucas.wordpress.com site

Traffic on the old richardhlucas.wordpress.com site

I am no technical wizard but it seems surprising that with no new posts since February, traffic on the old site seems to be higher than on the new.

An old Google Hack from my past was a way to show the number of inbound links –  a key concept in Google Page Rank. I don’t know if it still is accurate or significant, but it shows  287 inbound links to the old blog.. link: https://richardhlucas.wordpress.com  used compared to a Stellar 1 to the new  – admitttedly from the  ultra high value late and much lamented Economist’s Eastern Approaches  blog  –

link:www.richardlucas.com  links only to The Economist’s inbound link to my site, whereas

link: http://www.richardlucas.com has over 100,000 (note that E.L – the author of The Economist’s article is TEDxKrakow and TEDxKazimierz speaker, Economist journalist and author –  Edward Lucas, my admirable and brave big brother)

 richardlucasblog

Traffic on the new Richardlucas.com blog 

The question are?

Why is traffic on the old WordPress site higher and and on the new site lower?

Was it a mistake to change?

Is there some means to improve traffic on the new site?

I’m going to post this on both my old blog here  and the new and try to compare the traffic to both, and send a link to this post to my WordPress consultant Rafał.

My business partner Pawel thought that it might be because WordPress does a good job of indexing blogs hosted on its site.

Anyone with other ideas about what may be going on is welcome to get in touch. Whether the Zombie will return to its resting place depends on what I what I find out.

by Richard Lucas

February 2016

I’m writing this post on the invitation of Jenny Belotserkovsky – one of the co-founders of Jews For Entrepreneurs.

The route to this blog post started with a Mixergy podcast  – where I heard Max Shevakov being interviewed by Andrew Warner on, the home of the upstart entrepreneur.  Max was talking about how he had built up and sold his business lending lenses to photographers.(Mixergy is a great resource for bootstrapping entrepreneurs – better than business school –  I gladly pay  $200 for my subscription and also another $400 as a gift to the founder of a recent investment). Once again for those who don’t know about the incredible resources available from the world of English language podcasting   try Googling “x and best Podcasts” where x = something you are into).

I made contact with Max because I have recently invested in Zalamo.com – a software tool for professional photographers. I thought Max could be a good mentor, give us advice about our marketing strategy – when we start going after the US market where he build his business   Max was helpful, is ready to review our US marketing plan once it is created.  I noticed on his Linkedin profile he was a member of Jews for Entrepreneurs. I hadn’t heard of JFE but I have had several conversations with my friend Jonathan Ornstein – Director of the highly successful Jewish Community Centre in Krakow (where I live) about broadening the connection between the JCC and the thriving  Startup scene in Poland.   To know more about the great work of the JCC read and/or watch Jonathan’s TEDx talk, or Chief Rabbi Schudrich’s.   Hear Jonathan’s TEDxWarsaw talk here , Warsaw Rabbi Schudrich’s here  Read about Jonathan and the JCC here

I asked Max for an introduction to JFE which led me to Jenny, who wrote back full of interest and support. Jenny encouraged me with her response “It’s our goal to connect Jewish startup communities worldwide and we are excited to hear about the resurgence of Jewish life and startup innovation in Poland. It would be great to showcase Poland’s innovation with our network. We recently launched a renovated site for JFE Network.  We would be thrilled to add Polish-Jewish startups to our startup vault and share with our community and investor network in Silicon Valley, New York, and Israel.  Every Tuesday, we send out a weekly email with new startups, jobs, and blog posts from tech experts in our community. We can send an upcoming email campaign (9.6k people) featuring Polish innovation. We can showcase Polish startups and feature blog posts from innovators and thought leaders in the Polish community.”

This was just the response I wanted. I asked Startup Poland   (I’m on the Advisory Board) for examples of Jewish Israeli Polish entrepreneurship in Poland. The most prominent fund is Giza Polish Ventures which has many investments in startups. There is a good overview of the Polish startup scene on the Startup Poland web site and an American website called Google is excellent at providing lots of links and articles Passive aggressive Richard often refers people to this website as a starting point, but I don’t think now is the time.

Poland is a country with strong regional hubs. Cities like Gdańsk, Katowice, Lublin , Poznan, Rzeszow Szczecin, Wrocław as well as Kraków where I live and the capital Warsaw have startup activity. Berlin is just over the border too and Polish/German relations are better than would be believable a few years ago. Cheap flights and visa free travel (thanks to the European Union) to Europe and modernized airports mean that getting to London, Paris, Cambridge, Dublin, Milan and most other major European cities is very straightforward.

I’m biased towards Krakow – we have several world class startups here in Kraków – Estimote* world leader in Beacons, Base world leader in mobile first CRM, Brainly – a world leader in social learning. Integer Group is the world leader in final mile drop off pick up logistic and is active in 20 plus countries, Meble.pl is doing to furniture what Dell did to PC manufacturing. There are any number of smaller companies also doing interesting things.

Campus Warsaw has  opened  in 2015. This has put the Warsaw startup scene on steroids. It’s got off to a fantastic start. Previously Google for Entrepreneurs Krakow (GEK) did a great job. Hub.Raum in Kraków owned by T-Mobile. and Colab*.pl (a co-working space owned by members of the Startup community including me) have stepped forward to fill the gap left when Google departed. There is still a fan club for GEK here

The Krakow Startup community chose the hashtag and brand #OMGKRK ! Find links here omgkrk.com and here

There is an  excellent events listing site called Crossweb.pl . I won’t name any specific events for fear of annoying those in charge of the events  I omit.

TED and TEDx are active in Poland. Progressive, internationalist, open-minded people are involved. See their listings here I moderate a TEDx Fans group on Facebook here   I’m the Curator of TEDxKazimierz and a huge fan of the whole movement in Poland and worldwide.

The other community event I am closely connected to is Open Coffee Krakow which works very well indeed – low budget, high impact, useful and productive. Our Linkedin group is here Another group Silicon Valley Network is here  Finally my podcast Project Kazimierz showcases success and interesting initiatives usually connected to Poland.

JFE are going to link back to this blog post in their newsletter, and I encourage anyone interested in networking with them to sign up for their newsletter here

What’s next

In terms of possible outcomes and next steps – I hope this initiative triggers mutually beneficial contacts. Not just at the level of investments, but startups doing business, licensing technologies, buying selling each other’s products and services, outsourcing opportunities and pure research. Please leave a comment or let me know if it does. It’s good to keep track of the impact of actions. Perhaps JFE can visit Poland – members are warmly invited if they are thinking abut it do. Or maybe host a mission of Polish startups to the US. For sure there are people here who would welcome you. People do business with people, and personal contacts can be enriching. Maybe something with the JCC.

I’m not Jewish, Israeli or Polish (though I’ve spent most of my adult life in Poland)**. I am deeply internationalist in outlook and believe that flourishing businesses that create wealth, jobs and pay their taxes are the bedrock of free societies. We need all the prosperity and growth we can in these difficult times to pay for the many pressing challenges that face us.

If anyone reading this wants to get in touch, I cannot guarantee personal help but will do my best to get you in front of the right people. Readers are welcome to make contact via Linkedin

* I’m a shareholder in these ventures.
** since writing this article I’ve applied for and been granted Polish citizenship, for which I am profoundly grateful.

 

February 2016

I just created a new Google form to recruit business partners, following a conversation with my friend, business and squash partner Pawel Nowak.   Will it work ? I don’t know. Below is the introduction  you will  read if you click on it.. to read the questions as well, you need to go to the form itself

Feedback welcome

Co founders/entrepreneurs/partners for Richard Lucas

Why this form?I realised in February 2016 that I don’t have a good co-founder recruitment process. I’m known as an angel investor, and entrepreneur. I don’t often get people approaching me wanting to be a co-founder. I am ready to contribute time money experience and contacts to new ventures I am involved in, so this form is designed to encourage people who want to be my partner or co founder get in touch.

if you don’t know who I am check me out here
http://richardlucas.com/about-2
https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardhlucas
(if you are an Eddie Izzard fan take the opportunity to re-watch the Death Star Canteen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ma3a7hqZer4

It is extremely difficult to profile a co-founder. If I look at the people I am in business with they vary tremendously. And as in attraction, love and relationships just because I might want to be in business with someone, doesn’t mean that they will regard me as being a suitable partner.

You are likely to have at least some of the below characteristics.

• high levels of motivation and energy
• excellent/reasonable/acceptable interpersonal skills,
• creativity
• self confidence,flexibility, tolerance, open mindedness. I’m internationalist in outlook. Patriotism is fine, nationalism and intolerance absolutely not.
• a willingness to “get your hands dirty”. To do work needed rather than just describe it.
• ability to communicate in English, other languages a plus.
• willingness to learn, to start solving a problem by spending an hour or two on Google before wanting to hire an expert.
• A willingness to try and take on new challenges.
• Generosity.
• High expectations of yourself and other people.
• Good communication skills
• Toughness -the ability to take hard decisions
• Curiosity about the way the world works
• Good at Time management, self organisation and getting things done
• intolerance of waste, interest in getting things done well as effeciently and quickly as possible
• Ambitious. a desire to build work on something great. it doesn’t have to be a project with the scale of of Space X or Tesla (though why not?) but if we are doing a shoe repair business, let’s aim to make it the best run, most efficient and profitable in Europe.
• Profit orientated. A business that is not aiming to make a higher rate of profit than the average, as much if not more than the best companies is not interesting. Being cheaper than the competition may be a strategy, if our costs are lower. but if we are better then we should be able to prove it by charging more. If you for example – want to start a bar, and you don’t know how much bars like the one you want to set are making, you have not done you homework. The profitability of businesses can be found out, if you don’t know how, ask me.
• be able to code, or manage developers. It doesn’t mean that we won’t pay for development, but a technical co founder can bring the ability to spend money wisely.

• common sense.

Money. It’s great to know if you have got some savings. All too often the mind set of technology start up-ers is conditioned by years of grants and competitions. They want to rewards of their own business without ever experiencing the financial risk of failure. Of course someone who has 2 kids and 10,000 złoty in savings, is not in a position to put in significant amounts of cash, but on the other hand, to be in that position at all,  shows they know how to manage their money. it’s a plus. And I know they will work like crazy to succeed.Many of the successful entrepreneurs I know started with their savings, or money borrowed from friends or family who expected their investment to be spent carefully. Many ventures which started with “easy money” from me or others have ended up with the founder and me losing time and money. The ability to learn fast and think is more important than previous experience, People with motivation and commitment tend to pick up experience as they go through life. If you have no experience of anything what have you been doing between the age of 3 and now?

Richard Lucas January 2016

Every now and again I come across ideas and projects so worthwhile that I make contact with the people behind them.

BBC Radio has been running a series  “100 Women” and there were impressive broadcasts from Ghana and Uganda.

through which I heard of  Ernestina Appiah here  Founder of Ghana Code Club   and Rasheeda Yehuza of Tech Needs Girls

Rasheeda Yehuza www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p038dxr9

Rasheeda Yehuza 
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p038dxr9

both episodes are musts – listen to Rasheeda here 

Interesting things have happened as a result of me approaching people I hear on podcasts, see on line, read about in articles. Often I see myself as  doing what Derek Sivers recommends in his famous TED talk as an under rated form of leadership, helping others who are doing great things.

Derek Sivers' "First Follower" TED talk

So I contacted both Tina and Rasheeda offering help, not just because I believe in so doing, but also because I want others to do likewise..

Tina send me a ton of information about what she is doing Ghana Code Club designs step by step project guide for kids using scratch, HTML+CSS and Python. Most of the schools i volunteer in do not have access to internet nor projectors, (We’re working with the Parent Teacher Association in fixing these) until then, there’s no other option but to print out the project guidelines. Each project normally has an average of 15 pages, including challenges for the kid to try out before the next session.We’re using scratch to build a PAINT BOX for example this week, and this project has at least 18 pages, please find attached. There are not less than 100 kids in the first school that need a copy each of the guide, so your money will help print out projects for at least 150 kids, and we shall inscribe your name and logo on our websites as our supporting partner. We shall also establish good relationship with you as gestures like yours is a great honor to us. We’re continually seeking for  funding each week for print outs alone until the schools we volunteer in get projectors and internet connectivity, getting the materials to the kids remain a challenge to us. Another area we need help in is getting our training centre together making it possible for the less privileged children to be taught for free. In Ghana, most government schools where the less privileged children are have no access to computer labs that are functioning. This remains a headache to some of us who are willing to help. Having our own computer lab can go a long way. We’ll need funding for rent, Computers, air conditioners, internet service, furniture, projectors setting these up. If this can be achieved, the sky is the limit. We are also looking for funding to get our back office together on our website where we can pack training materials including video for volunteers. So you see ….  immediate funding and future funds will go a very long way.

(I sent money with Azimo.com –  Marek Wawro the CTO lives in Kraków, and helps mentor startups for free. The transfer when very smoothly 🙂  I also asked Tina for some pictures that might encourage others and show what could be done with my support but  but was not expected what I received a few days ago

Thank you messages

Ghana Code Club showing printed hand outs

Ghana Code Club showing printed projects

BBC World Service show presented by Bola Mosuro

Thanks on Twitter

I also asked her for a project description/report. This is what Tina sent

REPORT ON GHANA CODE CLUB AS AT JANUARY 2016 by Ernestina Appiah

Ghana Code Club is a digital fun club that is designed to be led by volunteers or ICT teachers in elementary schools all over Ghana, led by trained volunteers or ICT teachers. The club begins after regular classes are over for 2hours or less once in a week.

We initiated such a program because currently, there is little or no digital making activities in elementary schools in Ghana, meanwhile the world is revolving with technology. It is our aim that as children goes through the coding projects and challenges that come along with the project, kids’ interest in technology will grow causing them to participate and patronize other digital making in the future so that we can have a lot of innovators, entrepreneurs and critical thinkers.

The Ghana Code Club began in August last year during the summer vacation school at the Hillview Montessori School in Accra, where I, (the founder) volunteered to teach myself using Scratch programming software. 80 kids between the ages of 8-14 started but after the regular school resumed, the number of kids tripled to over 240 forcing us to split the class into groups. Currently, there are 2 computer labs at the Hillview Montessori School. One has a sitting capacity of 30 and the other has 60. And so each week, we have 3 sessions. I supervise groups 1 and 2 with 2 other volunteers and group 3 is supervised by the ICT teachers who are happy to share in our vision and have been trained to become volunteers of the code club.

On other days, we visit 4 other schools where we are repeating the same procedure as we do at the Hillview School. Unfortunately the other schools do not have more than 40 computers and so we are forced to limit the number of kids who are willing to join the club.

As of January 2016,

  • Hillview Montessori School has 257 members with 5 volunteers including 2 ICT teachers
  • Gospel International has 70 members- 3 volunteers including 1 ICT teacher
  • Liver Rose International has 83 members-3 Volunteers including ICT teacher
  • Rising Sun Montessori school has 60 members- 4 Volunteers including 2 ICT teachers
  • University Primary has 80 members 3 volunteers including 2 ICT teachers 

Curriculum

We have designed projects in Scratch, HTML+CSS and Python languages. We start with the basics of scratch language where kids are thought to explore to obtain the basic principles in programming.

Challenges

Currently out of all the 5 schools we visit, only one school, University Primary, Legon that has necessary infrastructure to make learning  easy in place. We have quite a challenge with power outages in the country until January 2016, when power cuts have slowed down a bit. When power cuts off, we need to close our session and the kids may need to take their step by step project printouts home to continue without our supervision.

There is no internet in 4 out of the 5 schools. But we are fortunate that the languages we have chosen have offline options. But to share the finished project on the internet is a challenge. Sometimes, we the volunteers end up using our own internet modems and airtime to enable the kids share their creativity online

We also have a big challenge when it comes to screening videos that can empower the kids even more. This is because 4 out of the 5 schools do not have projectors. This makes supervision so tedious considering the number of children involved in each session. Anytime we start a new project, we hold our laptop and move about showing the kids how their finished project should look like.

Laptop instead of projector

Laptop instead of projector

 Since there are no projectors to project the instructions, we end up printing project guide to serve all these children which is so expensive. At the moment, Ghana Code Club does not have any source of funding from any organization. We rely on our pockets and some little donations from family and friends to keep on. Parents are not supporting us yet because the school authorities have not agreed to the demand of the code club to seek for donations from the parents. The authorities of one of the schools have asked that we hold on to the close of the month January, 2016 where a PTA meeting will be held and parents informed formally about the Ghana Code Club activities. 3 of the other schools support once in a while with the printing using their own resources

OUR NEEDS

  • Ghana Code Club requests for support to be launched out formally once our back office is ready to serve as training resources for volunteers. We need funds for storing the resources including video tutorials. We intend to invite technology institutions and the minister of education in Ghana to help us outdoor this initiative into all elementary schools in Ghana..
  • We need funds to be supporting our day to day runnings. Transportation, airtime, electricity bills, Project guides and volunteer meet-ups.
  • We need a projector with accessories, Printers and photocopiers and one laptop.
  • We also want to establish our own computer lab where other activities can take place. Some children from the government schools where there are non functional computer labs can attend our sessions on weekends. We can train others who are willing to pay to ease our day to day expenditure.

Of course I want to help, and others to do so as well. I informed contacts in Google and Astia about what they are doing, and  I introduced Tina to Emmanuel Leslie Addae Curator of TEDxAccra –  with whom I made contact having figured out that her story and project might be worthy of a TEDx talk. They have yet to meet. Perhaps more publicity and introductions can help Ghana Code Club find deeper pockets than mine and encourage other people to do similar projects in other schools, towns and countries.

Rasheeda Yehuza’s project ” Tech Needs Girls” is also looking for partnerships. she wrote “Tech Needs Girls would be excited to explore a collaboration! A donation would really help propel our activities as we scale country-wide, and an introduction to the Polish coding community will be fantastic.”   I haven’t found a partner for her yet. but am looking around.

Not everything is making progress. I heard about the mDex smart phone clip for TB and Sickle Cell detection at Afri Gal technologies and tried to connect them to Peek Vision,   which has a high profile project for diagnosing eye disorders at low cost also with a smart phone clip one.  I thought that the UK project would be a good source of advice and mentoring., So far Afri Gal Tech haven’t taken up on this offer. but who know what may happen. Their project is really impressive sounding, and I yet believe I may be able to help

Conclusions

The idea worth spreading in the above experience is that it is worth trying There is nothing to stop anyone reaching out to anyone anywhere. Google and Twitter make it so easy, and finding out what you can do to help.  It’s my belief rather than a proven fact that my approaches in these cases was the right one. I know that it is too early to tell. If the only benefit is that  of my donation, then the gift without any associated PR could be enough.    The test of whether it  was worth going my public with introductions and posts like this will be whether over the next few months, other positive things happen as a result.    This story at the time of writing-  24th January 2016 – is a work in progress.  I’ll update in a few months. The fact that some offers of help have not led to anything is important to note as well. If you don’t try to do anything you won’t fail, but of course  you can’t succeed either.. As J. K. Rowling says in her wonderful Harvard Commencement talk a life lived without risk of risk of failure is hardly worth living at all.

Richard Lucas   March 2017

Introduction

Wedding photography is a business like any other. The rewards go to those who are focussed,  professional and work hard. Much the information in this article is based on listening an impressive podcast “For Wedding Photographers by Louis Torres. The great thing about Louis is that he is a real live breathing walking talking practicioner. He bases his advice on his own hard work and experience.

http://louistorres.com

Many of my Polish readers are not so aware of the wonderful world of English language podcasting (there just aren’t enough listeners in non-global languages but English language podcasting is full of gems).

The Podcast on iTunes.

Louis has been a photographer for 26 years and can charge US$4000-6000 for a wedding package, although is ready to reduce the cost by scaling back the package.  You have to listen to the podcast to understand how much effort he puts in to doing his job well.  There are 300 episodes with more than 80 hours of content since 2009. Louis tell photographers that they must not be lazy,  should do their own research. He is tough and blunt, which makes each short episode all the more useful. For those who are serious about being successful – there will be valuable lessons.

If someone already regards themselves as a full fledged professional, then this podcast can even be a check list. It will be reassuring to hear someone at the top of the game in a far off rich country is doing the same things as they are.  I am sure everyone will learn something.  Louis argues that anyone can and will become an expert at finding anything they’d like to learn by doing research using Google and that the difference between an amateur and a professional photographer is the way he or she markets themselves.

Some of his recommendations are just common sense and obvious, but important.
– don’t just be punctual, be early. Get to your venue an hour before you are due. Park, and wait, walk in exactly when you are expected. You can read a book, even listen to his podcast.  It leaves you time for a flat tyre, transport delays.
–  don’t charge for a wedding – if you are first timer.   “only”  $500-1000 is way too much to charge if you are inexperienced.
His advice for those who are getting started: Do you homework, research, prepare, practice, get the right equipment, and then do weddings for free for family, friends or people who don’t have a budget, Do your best,  but don’t promise to be something you are not. Build your portfolio so that you can base first paid offers on experience and references.
Here are some of his tips and ideas if you are already photographing weddings.
Focus on your relationship with the happy couple. Of course they want someone professional, but also friendly, nice, respectful and funny.  This starts from way before the wedding, from first contact, maybe at Bridal Shows, to discussions and feedback about the plan for the day, to the day itself, post wedding communications and delivery of photos in whatever format has been agreed.  The photographer’s experience should lead to advising clients to take the right decisions. They don’t have the experience,   the photographer does.
Get those shots done. On the day, the couple may want the photographer to wait and not take photos at particular moments,  but Louis advises that the photographer should  take the photos anyway. The situation you want to record may never arise again, a key family person may be missing, leave early, No one will remember that you were told to wait. Get the shots when you can.
Show some photos on the day itself During the wedding,  use meal breaks to process and post some photos on social media like Facebook pages. Have a stand and a big monitor/screen where you can show some of the photos in an elegant slideshow. Bring more down to the party in the evening.  The couple, their family and  guests will love to see the photos right away, will be impressed by your speed and professionalism.  Each wedding may have couples who are engaged, who are very likely to ask you for a business card. You will pick up more clients.
There are numerous other episodes covering issues like how important it is to focus, time management,  tools for processing, editing and distributing photos, contracts, deposit payments.  I have no doubt that if I had time to listen to more I would know much more. You can learn about important industry events, his recommended vendors of complementary products and technology tools., If you want to learn about wedding photography  this podcast is a great place to start. You get the wisdom and experience of a successful straight talking American professional.

http://louistorres.com/forweddingphotographers/why

As Simon Sinek TED talks fan knows, the most important question is  Why.  Louis takes the time to answer that too.

There are  lessons in this podcast and hopefully this blog post –  for a listener who knows nothing about photography, and doesn’t want to be a wedding photographer too.

For everyone –  work hard, push and educate yourself, learn how to sell what you do, be friendly and nice to your clients. –  heck iTunes for podcasts about the areas you want to learn about. It won’t be a waste of time, and a hat tip to the remarkable Louis Torres
Richard Lucas January 2016
What I don’t know, why it matters, and the importance of knowing the right questions to ask
I spent a serious amount of time looking for answers to questions that are relevant to the businesses I am involved in, or researching business projects. If I find what I am looking for, I forward it on with a few comments to the person to whom it is relevant. Other times, I can’t find what I am looking for, which means an unsolved problem.
My search for answers is also inefficient because along the way I find out facts,  issues, problems and ideas that are new to me,  meaning that I distract myself with my own curiosity, and often have new business ideas.
My process involves Google (and learning how to search Google well is a skill – that – like others – can be improved), Googling people I hear on the radio,  all kinds of social media,  Linkedin, Youtube, Slideshares, Investor  information sections of listed companies, Trade Associations, Event speaker, attendee and exhibitor lists, this list is long.
When I cannot find what I am looking for I sense an opportunity. If what I want to know is valuable, the value of knowing it may be high (or perhaps worthless:-))
Years ago, a startup magazine called Proseed published a column where I acted as a kind of “Agony Aunt” to entrepreneurs.   I am not so arrogant – I hope-  as to share my “wisdom” about everything I read.  If I don’t have something to say it is better to stay quiet.   Derek Sivers shares his notes about the books he has read and recommends on his excellent blog – but he is successful with some excellent and hugely popular TED talks behind him, not to mention his business success with CD Baby which he sold for US$20 million.

I am however going to flip it round. I am planning to start posting questions I don’t know the answer to, and to explain why these are important.

If some contacts me and can help, then maybe they can be a business partner, or potentially work for me finding the solution.

Why bother? why does this matter?
The gap between being ignorant, a generalist and a specialist is important to understand.
To be a successful entrepreneur – I recommend the advice of my father J. R. Lucas – who said to me when I was a teenager – “don’t be a specialist – if you need a specialist you can always find one” and that once you have a specialist skill you may well end up working using the skill in which you specialise for the rest of your life, because that will be the best rewarded in the short run.  This is not a bad outcome if this is what you want to do, but is not for anyone who doesn’t love their job.
My father’s advice is not great for anyone who has not worked out a way of generating income for themselves. Anyone who has never held down a professional salary should read  So Good They Can’t Ignore You  which sets out the opposing case for getting really good at something rather than following just your passion. The book is well summarised by Derek Sivers here .  If you are able to bring in more than enough money, without having a specific skill – this means you may never need to get one.  You may have the “what it takes” to be an entrepreneur. The ability to persuade people to buy things from you when you don’t know what you are talking about is worth having.
(thought the wherewithal to sell things you are not a specialist in, while showing an impressive ability to be convincing,  may involve taking risks of major problems).
While there are reasons not to be a specialist, I am not arguing for, or celebrating ignorance.  You should aim to be a generalist, to know enough to ask the right questions, to tell if someone is BS-ing  you, and to be able to tell a specialist what you want and why.  A version of the 80/20 Pareto rule applies –  that you can learn 80% of what matters quickly, the remain 20% may be for the specialist. Read the Wikipedia entry, watch a TED talk or two, read The Economist. listen to a podcast, watch the most popular slideshares, skim the top ten entries on Google, and within an hour you will know much more than most, and maybe enough to find a specialist.  Maybe then you can hire or find the specialist.
I regularly listen to the Digital Marketing Podcast from Target Internet for its clear language, sensible advice, easy to understand and recently I heard this episode about Programmatic Advertising.  (Once when I wrote to Daniel Rowles – the CEO and founder – and he wrote back immediately with helpful advice, a great way to make him a potential partner in the future. I am researching B2B marketing using Adsense type marketing. This podcast enabled me to search intelligently, finding list like this  with specialist firms, and making me confident to post here on Facebook.
European B2B Startup Group on FacebookThe post shows that as well as needing a specialist I know enough not to be ripped off and to deter digital marketing agencies that don’t know what they are talking about. I’d heard of Real Time Bidding RTB before, but not SSP,  DSP and various another acronyms.
The conclusion – > Don’t be afraid to admit you don’t know ad hoy are not a specialist but not before you have spent an hour or two turning yourself into a generalist.  And here is another great podcast from Daniel about how to keep your digital skills up in the world of specialists. Effectively he is advising listeners to be generalists.
And if you know how to help organise our RTB on line research, get in touch.

I won’t analyse other than to note that
– he has a BIG vision
– he is aiming for 500 million monthly users.
he loves his job

thanks to Michał for the interview, and  my Project Kazimierz Podcast co host Sam Cook

Richard

A Quora question here  provoked this Sunday morning article.

Richard.
Q What does the startup community need from Campus Warsaw? 

Great question.
1. Support, attend  and partner with regular monthly or more frequent monthly events and meetups across Poland (not just Warsaw)  –  with satellite events/monthly meetup like Open Coffee Krakow OpenCoffeeKRK (that used to take place in Google For Entrepreneurs Krakow ) and events Hive  KrakSpot    Startup Stage and those posted on #OMGKRK – Kraków’s startup community and Crossweb – wszystkie Barcampy, spotkania i konferencje

2.  Co-operate with existing pro- startup and enterprise organisations like AIP and Fundacja Startup Poland

3  Support pro-entrepreneurship movements like Global Entrepreneurship Week.

4. Invite and encourage government officials from all Ministries to attend existing events (not just do their own). Use Google’s pulling power to get officials involved and engaged. It can and does work. In the South Poland region, for example the country authority runs this  as its contribution to Global Entrepreneurship Week.

5. Encourage low/no cost initiatives – like Open Coffee Krakow movement – throwing money at events makes them happen even if there is no community buy in.

6. Co-operate and support social entrepreneurship like the  TEDx movement TEDx | Event Listing | TED.com

7.   Support development of curriculum based events (finance, marketing, coding) through encouraging meetups on themes or thematic groups like Krakow Unity 3D Meetup Group
8. Support enterprise education in schools , especially at pre-school and primary school level before it its too late
Strona główna – Fundacja Młodzieżowej Przedsiębiorczości
Przedsiębiorcy z naszej szkoły (not just Gymnasium and Liceums)

9 lobby for, and support liberal work and entrepreneur visa regime in Poland for non-Schengen professionals and entrepreneurs. Show that Poland is more open to non-EU  talent than countries like the UK and USA.

10. Invite organisations that could be part of the entrepreneurship support ecosystem:

law firms,
IP Agents,
accountants,
banks,
VCs,
chambers of commerce,
trade associations,
business schools,
universities,
political parties,
government bodies
Charities
NGOs
 to identify people responsible for dealing with startups, and invite them to workshops to present  what they are doing to help enterprise. (It may shame them into action if,  as may often be the case, they were doing nothing before Google asked them to present).

11. Keep promoting enterprise among minorities and  socially excluded groups, including prisons like Last Mile, in refugee camps, and support diversity.

Highlight Polish success stories like Applicake, Azimo, Base, Brainly, Estimote. (no regional bias 🙂 of course)

12. be interviewed on projectkazimierz.com   🙂

13. encourage angel investors

14. Encourage Polish doctors not automatically to ask every patient how many days off work they want no matter what issue  the patient has,

15 Encourage journalists to stop promoting anti-work culture,  saying “szkoda ze weekend się skonczy” and “”na szczęście już piątek.”

Richard

Richard Lucas August 2015

When Google for Entrepreneurs announced that it was leaving Kraków and opening its Campus in  Warsaw many people in Kraków Startup Commmnity were a bit disappointed. However, it is better that Google Campus  in in Poland than elsewhere, and as  Dawid Ostrowski of Google Developers Relations pointed out Krakow has a lot of lessons to share in terms of building a dynamic startup community. Borys Musielak is one of the leading lights of the Warsaw Startup Community, on the board of Startup Poland  and the founder of Reaktor .   I saw that their birthday party was full/sold out. See the comments here  and thought that it was appropriate to wish Reaktor and the Warsaw startup community all the best, happy birthday, (and let’s gently compete to see who has the first Polish Unicorn – go Go Azimo 🙂 Go Base, Go Brainly… (I think Integer and Comarch may be their already 🙂

For the benefit of those who are thinking about how to do large scale and positive events in Warsaw, I am sharing how the first X-Massive party came into being in 2013.

Community building is a process and doesn’t happen overnight.

It is very important to make your events welcoming and positive for the new comer, who doesn’t know anyone, have any contacts and is wondering if entrepreneurship and the startup community is a  place where they will feel welcome.

See Open Coffee Krakow and Hive values.  my post on Community Building, based also on my experiences in the TED and TEDx community and Global Entrepreneurship Week initiatives.

#OMGKRK stands for positivity,  optimism sharing and support. Go Warsaw Sto Lat Reaktor.

Richard  Lucas

We appreciate what Google For Entrepreneurs did here, and are thinking about doing a Google For Entrepreneurs Krakow (fan club) meet up in September October to which of course you are all will be invited. (This idea is inspired by TED-ster Clay Shirky and his story of Josh Groban and the Grobanites, Read more here ). If anyone reading this wants to help or get involved, drop me a note on Linkedin or Facebook.

This is the comment thread that kicked off the party, It took a few hours to get 90% of the Krakow community on board.

23 November 2013 · End of year startup community “un-party” with TEDxWarsaw Salon/Couchsurfing style icebreakers

Last year with MSFBCC I organised the below party for the startup community.

If you are interested in helping do something amazing this year, come to a planning meeting Wed 27th evening at 19 @ Nowa Prowincja Bracka 3-5. send me a note if you are coming.

See More

Together with Małopolskie Studenckie Forum Business Centre Club – the most active pro business student community in our region, Hive are proud to invite you to our Christmas party Tuesday, 18…
HIVE53.COM
Richard Lucas
July 2015
Open Coffee Kraków  is on the move -> this time to Colab our next meeting is on 16th July at Colab  ul. Romanowicza 4
as usual at 08:00 sharp
Open Coffee Krakow
It’s been a journey since we started.   www.ockrk.co/OpenCoffeeKRK/1
Since Marta’s announcement at a Hive meeting late 2012/early 2013 about her idea of a  Brad Feld inspired Kraków version of Open Coffee, and her feeling that a morning “un-meeting” made sense, Open Coffee Kraków has boomed, shrunk, split and re formed. At one stage – this child of Ela Madej and Piotr Nedzyński’s Hive53.com  was larger than Hive itself.
The spirit of a “participant led, un meeting, where the focus is not on speakers but positivity, support, open-ness and inclusiveness”  is alive and well. Personally,
I’ve much enjoyed telling people about
 – our strict rules concerning commercial promotion “”we are in favour”
– that Kraków stands for internationalism, trade and open-ness
–  making people  clap and applaud each other, (and government officials when they come)
– playing mood bending Mrs Mills Stripe piano as our theme music at 07:30. I still am determined to lead a Honky Tonk Winifred Atwell piano revival in Krakow.. ,, anyone who wants to help make this happen – get in touch.
– I loved writing the FAQ including not very subtle passive aggressive Q&A like those here. 8 8. You ought to do A B and C  and this  Why don’t you do X  and this one  here 
 I know that there are people who for OCKRK has changed their jobs and lives.
This is not the place to thank our coders Aliaksei, , faithful regular attendees and volunteers like Łukasz, photographers like Andrzej or bloggers like Wojtek, our generous sponsors and partners like those listed here and above all Marta for making it happen.
Since our first meeting in Dynia on Krupnicza, Open Coffee Kraków has evolved, grown, got smaller, and  spread.   We moved to Charlotte on Pl Szczepański, had many happy months  at Google for Entrepreneurs Kraków supported by Dawid  Paulina and Wojtek, and in recent months been in Kraków’s “diplomatic quarter” at Ambasada Krakowian on Stolarska.
One of our spin offs  Open Coffee Colab, under Kamil’s able leadership has grown to be bigger than our recent meetings on Stolarska, and after discussions with Marta and Kamil we decided for now to merge the events and have one event every two weeks in Colab.
Action item
The spirit is intact, the power is with us we still want and look for support. engagement and involvement.  Please give Kamil, Marta and myself the maximum support  –  and keep the spirit of Kraków and OMG alive.
Richard
PS  
Following discussions at Bispiration I’m thinking for doing an Google for Entrepreneurs Krakow (fans)  meetup in September. which if successful may turn into a regular event  – to help support and celebrate the fact that Google Campus is coming to Poland. Watch this space.
Richard Lucas
14th June 2015

A standing ovation for Alina Malocha at TEDxKazimierz 2017

Introduction  

So it’s early Sunday morning and  TEDxKraków came to a close yesterday.  Not everyone knows about TED and TEDx. A very  successful businessman and friend called John told me just last week  – “I really must look into this TEDx thing”.  Here is a short introduction about TED and TEDx by Chris Anderson.

For my friend John maybe the TED journey lies ahead (He gave a talk at TEDxKazimierz in 2017)

For me TED.com and TEDx is such a part of my life that the  “My TED story” section  on my profile on TED.com  reads

“I curated TEDxKazimierz in 2015. I spoke at TEDxKraków about running a global movement with no budget via a Facebook group, and at TEDxWrocław Salon about it never being too late (or early) to get into entrepreneurship   I’ve been a sponsor, speaker, team member, co-organiser and supporter of or at  TEDxKrakow, TEDxKrakowCinema,  TEDxYouth@Krakow, TEDxYouth@Podgorze, TEDxWarsawSalon, TEDxWarsawPresidentialPlace I set up the TED and TEDx fans and Travel and Meetup Club on Facebook which aims to bring Couchsurfing values and practice to TED and TEDx fans  I use TED.com talks in enterprise workshops I run in schools and universities as a volunteer on the Polish committee for Global Entrepreneurship Week.   I believe TED is part of my optimistic vision of the way the world should be. I interview TEDx-ers and TEDx speakers on my blog  I like people who like TED. I’ve transcribed a TEDx talk for the Open Translation Project.”
I could write more – but the form only allows 1000 characters.
The purpose of this article is to state why TED and TEDx are so important to me and could be important to you.   I see it is as follows:
Everyone will do something with their lives  – from the terribly destructive –  through the average –  to the sublimely positive.
As Ashton Kutcher said in a talk worthy of the TED stage to the Teen Choice awards
“”you can build your own life that other people can live in. So build a life. Don’t live one, build one. Find your opportunities”.
Just as everyone has  choices as to whether they do the most important things they have to do every single day of their lives, everyone has the possibility and choice to live the best version of their life if they want to.  
 TED and TEDx greatly increase the chances that you can have a happy and productive life.   

As Sam Cook said in his TEDxKazimierz talk 23rd May this year

“you should aim to chose the career and job you love so much you would pay to do it”.

My brother Edward Lucas who spoke both at TEDxKraków in 2011 and TEDxKazimierz in 2015 sometimes said of his work at The Economist that
“I would pay to do what I do”.

In the Project Kazimierz podcast interview with Daniel Ciupryk (aka MC Silk) who had a viral Youtube hit   says “minute 46:11

” It might sound, you know, too simple, but it was said a lot… Really it’s the thing that you have to find the thing that you really love because if you don’t find it, then you try to focus on things that will give you money or fame, you won’t be good at it because you can only be good at things that you love because you will try and get up, and try and try until you reach that satisfaction level. And even though you might earn money on the other things, but still it won’t be success because you will be doing things that you don’t like for the rest of your life. You can only be great at things that you love because you will spend your free time, you’ll be thinking about it even though you’re not at work, and you will win over people that don’t love that thing that as much as you love it.”

TED-sters and TEDx-ers are not paid. Not the teams, the volunteers, nor the speakers. They are a group of people who:
–  work together for free to promote the idea that there are ideas worth spreading.
 – look for ideas worth spreading and projects worth promoting in their community and networks,
 – encourage people to give the talk of their lives in up to 18 minutes,
 –  put them on both a stage in front of a local community and on the internet in front of  a global audience for ever
 TED has migrated beyond its original domain of a conference about Technology Entertainment and Design-  to give leaders and activists from all walks of life a platform.
Why?
Why do TEDx-ers  spending their time like this help others improve their chance of living a useful life.
It is because TED and TEDx are  an intoxicating cocktail of inspiration, connection, example, positivity, entrepreneurship, optimism and  energy, embodied in the community of speakers and attendees, and the values they share. 

You are bombarded by ideas from the stage.

How can someone not be inspired by David Eagleman  whose talk was shown to TEDxKraków yesterday. I tracked David down, and we discussed with Scott Novich whether I could help promote his technologies here in Europe, Will anything come of it ? – I’m not sure. But a key step was the way a fabulous project reached  a global audience via TED.  TED started the conversation.

Piotr Wilam  technology entrepreneur and leading light and role model for the Polish startup community  yesterday talked about the importance of sustaining the community. He showed a slide featuring Estimote   as one of Kraków’s leading  Internet of Things –  IoT – cluster companies (declaration of an interest, I am an investor in Estimote)

Estimote in Piotr Wilam's TEDxKrakow talk

Estimote in Piotr Wilam’s TEDxKrakow talk

Jakub Krzych and Łukasz Kostka who founded the company started talking about the idea of Estimote at an earlier TEDxKraków in 2012.    So it is not just the fantastic ideas but the examples and role models of people you meet at TED or TEDx-es.   It is not just the super successful entrepreneurs and scientists like Tal Golesworthy’s  who repaired his own heart. It is also the inspiration of being surrounded by people who share optimistic, positive values based around the TED mission of “ideas worth spreading” and who are ready to devote their time and energy to the cause.

In our wired, technologically connected word we have more and more choices about who we hang out with and how we spend our time.  Instead of doing whatever you normally do with the people you normally hang out with you go to  a TEDx.

Who would rather hang out with?  People who are more into ideas or would rather go shopping? – if you prefer shopping, TEDx is not for you.

Spending time at a TEDx can be a bit of a reality distorting/mind bending experience for people who are not used to it.

If you are cynical and pessimistic, believe that the people in charge of things are typically only interested in feathering their own nests and looking after themselves, then a TEDx is a bit of challenge, to put it mildly.  An army of volunteers,  great speakers  – many of them busy and successful in other walks of life – devote hundreds and thousands of hours to make an event for you for free (Some TEDx-s charge, usually when they do it is  enough to cover costs)

Chris Anderson  – Curator of TED – gave a great talk about how the combination of attention, desire and instant global communication is accelerating innovation.   But it is not just the ideas but the people, because ideas worth spreading need to be put into action.   At a TEDx you are not just exposed to new ideas – but also meet people who are also interested in new ideas and are often doing something to put their ideas into action.
 TEDx-es also act  as filtering devices. I sometimes meet people who didn’t go to a TEDx because they applied too late to get a ticket, but if they cared they would prioritise it , or they had something else to do (no comment).  You meet a more interesting type of person at a TEDx
A word of caution –  there are no guarantees or certainties in life.  I cannot guarantee that a TED or TEDx you go to will be brilliant, that you will like all the talks, you will meet the love of your life. There is always a risk of disappointment.  When I’m responsible I take very seriously issues of making events fun friendly and welcoming. I’ve written about this in another blog post .  What I can say is that for sure you are likely to meet people who are into ideas  – and that makes them  more interesting than average.
Having done my first TEDx – TEDxKazimierz  –  on 23rd May 2015 I am considering whether to apply to do it again. It’s a huge commitment of time, energy and emotion, with much more stress than I expected. The talks are not uploaded yet  – but they will be soon,  When they do go on line you do nothing else see 90 year war hero prof. Wojtek Narębski give the talk that got him a totally deserved standing ovation
Professor Narębski on the TEDxKazimierz stage_TEDxKazimierz
For me his speech alone made the event worth doing.   At the end of this post I’m posting some of the positive comments I got about TEDxKazimierz thanks to the TED feedback process  – which make me think that if I can put the right team together I want to do it again. (so if you want to help fill in the form here) .
At just one TEDxKraków yesterday –   I was able to exchange words with
Ewa Spohn TEDxKrakow,
Ralph Talmont TEDxWarsaw
Michal Kasprzyk TEDxWrocław,
Tal Golesworthy, whose talk was on TED.com,
Agata Wilam – Children’s University,  who will become a talent scout for the next TEDxKazimierz, to welcome
Piotr Wilam  – Innovation Nest
The elite club of TEDxKraków talk giving alumni,
Małgorzata Kuś of the TED Open Translation Project,
Joanna  Łasocha,
Lech Madej,
Wioletta Dec,
Agata Wierzbicka
TEDxKrakow team,
Justyna Skowyra,
Radek Szczygieł,
Łukasz Siatka,
Ania Bywanis-Kwiecień of the TEDxKazimierz team
Ramon Tancinco Cisco and TEDxKrakow speaker
Bartosz Józefowski,  of Kraków Technology Park and leading the Startup Community in Kraków,
Krzysztof Kobyłecki and Michał Kalina of Innovation Nest,
Marek Wierbicki of Seedlabs
as well family and other friends, talk business with Flytech – a drone company, and meet a potential marketing manager for one of my businesses.
TEDx really is too good to be true – but at the same time it is completely real.
I loved  Stephen Coates talk about how people risked and lost their freedom in the USSR for the love of music. A timely reminder of how lucky we are to be free, and Ryszard Źróbek’s presentation of the Nowodworski choir was charming and emotional.
So thanks to all at TED.com HQ,  at TEDxKrakow and everyone else from sponsors to volunteers  who make such wonderful events possible.
Richard
Curator
TEDxKazimierz

Positive comments about  TEDxKazimierz from the TED Post event e-mail  survey.

TEDxKazimierz team on stage
Note This is not the full report. There were some negative comments (three  about one singer – which I accept will publish and address in detail elsewhere). this is a positive pro TED article so you see the sanitized version here)  98 responses (17 passives, 74 promoters, 7 detractors) 61 rated the event 10/10 max  14 rated the event 9/10 12 rated the event 8/10,  5 rated the event 7/10 3 rated the event 6/10  1 rated the event 5/10  2 rated the event 4/10  1  rated the event 0/10.

“that was a great experience”

|Event was very well organized, speakers were great and there was free food too 🙂

“Great organisation and fantastic guests. I have not known anyone there, but i had wonderful and inspiring time.”

“it was wonderful and very … personal!!! Exceptional experience!”

“TEDxKazimierz really was a special event for me. It was always my little wish to partecipate in TED. The fact it was organised in Krakow, in Kazimierz, was an additional adventage. The people who organized the event gave a heart to it. It was a pleasure to be there, see and meet so interesitng and motivated people who created this special

atmosfere and invited so amazing speakers. I think everyone should have this opportunity to, at least once, be and attendee of TED or TEDx.”`

“Everything was perfect ! :)”

“It was an amazing event where I could meet really awesome people. The variety of topics was really wide so everyone could find something for themself. ‘Age has no limit’ from so many different perspectives. So positive and developing”

“It was a very interesting and diversified event.”

“I had a really great time! It was something interesting. High level of organization, interesting program, good speakers give me a good motivation for self development. The topics mentioned at the event were really inspiring.”

“Great speakers, awesome music and people. The event was organised for the first time, but everything was great :)”

“I love watching TED and TEDx talks, but taking part in TEDx is 100 times more exciting. TEDx Kazimierz heleped me to find new inspirations and meet amazing people whom I would propably wouldnever meet otherwise.”`

“The conference was very well organized. Invited interesting speakers.

“Speeches were accompanied by interesting workshops. Ensured the possibility of linking with each other guests so that they can meet each other and referring interesting contacts. The event was accompanied by a great atmosphere. The organizers took care of the guests.”

“Good range of speaker, authenticity in enthusiasm of the organisers, valuable community spirit”

“It was an amazing experience – eye-opening and really worth taking part in. excellent event. good speakers, good organizers.”

“It was an inspiring and even moving event, with many great people taking part. All speeches were great, but some of them were truly amazing. Best way to spend your saturday!”

“ I loved the topic and the speakers. I think the atmosphere was great. I met two people who I will definitely cooperate with. Oh, and I just loved Richard’s way of running the whole event:) Thank you! “

“It was for the first time in my life I could experience Tedx live. Real people, real challenges, real emotions. What I appreciate the most is the passion in Tedx talks and in the choice of speakers. Very inspiringday. “

“Diverse speakers, interesting topics, good organization! Totally wouldrecommend the event to others, what I am already doing! “

“It was great event, great quality speakers, great organization”

“Great event! For sure worth spreading!”

“great and content of all presentations was very interesting. I will definitely participate in the next edition.””

“was a great conference that helped me to rethink what and why I am doing today. I believe that participation in event like that would be valuable experience for any of my friends and colleagues. “

“It was an unusual experience, which has already influenced my life.”

Everything was alright

“it was motivating event. Great job guys !”

““Po prostu było ciekawie, organizacja wypadła dobrze, a ekipa, która się tym zajmowała była przesympatyczna :)”

It was pretty great, although I think it should have been more focused on talks in english. “

“Because the atmoshere was fantastic and all the speeches presented ideas worth spreading. Balance between inspiration and knowledge.”

“Very good logistics. i think organistators did great job! And the place was awesome!!!”

“Great speakers, wonderful website, awesome venue.”“

“:The event was very well organised. The speakers were very interesting and what they said was thought-provoking and inspiring. I made some new friends.”

It was awesome !!! 🙂

“Event is perfectly organized. Speakers line up and topics was very inspiring and interesting. It was fit pretty well the general theme “Age is not a limit”. As non a native Polish-speaker (yet) It was a little bit difficult to listen to Polish talks w/o translation or printed materials/ details/transcriptions. Thanks the whole team! And hope to see and be a part of TEDx community again!”

“Naprawdę czułam się tam dobrze i wiele wyniosłam! Na każdym kroku było widać, że organizatorzy dbali o uczestników –

nie za pomocą wielkich nakładów i nie na pokaz, ale poprzez proste drobiazgi: – zdjęcia na wejściu, rozwieszone później na sznurku – ice brakery

– jedzenie! (proste a pomysłowe, zdrowe drobiazgi od konkretnych ludzi! – punkt za wizytówki do autorów przekąsek:)

– wielość opcji w przerwie – na pierwszy rzut oka ponad godzina wolnego budziła zdziwienie, ale każdy mógł znaleźć coś dla siebie – albo rozmowy z ludźmi, albo wykład o astronomii, albo pokazy sztuczek, albo po prostu słuchanie pianisty)

– dobór muzyków – bardzo autorski, bardzo odważny 😉 zupełnie “niehipsterski” 😉

– wspólne śpiewanie spinające cały dzień – i niesamowity, bardzo bardzo wzruszający finał z prof. Narembskim

– jak zwykle, komunikacja online przyjazna, ludzka i z dbałością o szczegóły

(jeden minus – tylko jedna toaleta 🙁 ale jak rozumiem to ograniczenie tego miejsca – nie warto by z tego powodu rezygnować z kapitalnych“ “

“In my opinion TEDxKazimierz was realy great experience, considering all of details: organization, atmosphere and people which were a part of it. Why 9, not 10? Well, it always may be better 🙂 “

“I chose 10 because all talks was very interesting and inspiring, organization was perfect and catering was delicious!”

“Galicia Jewish Museum was just a great place to be during the event. Not only the speakers were inspiring but also available for direct conversation after their speeches. It’s just a great event to attend if you’re open minded and want to not only get inspired but share you ideas in a great atmosphere of openness too. “

it was very impressive “

“It was great”

“It was very inspiring, the topics were interesting, the organizaton was really good. “

TEDx i have attended on Saturday, May 23rd was very interesting and inspirational event. I believe events like this should be widely shared and recommended to allow others. Everyone can learn something about themselves, about life and take it home with them. This event is like a spark, that can bring light where before there was not much of it, bring idea to place that needed one. And give support to those who want to change something around them. “

“TEDx Kazimierz was a great expirience for me. 4 of all the speakers were people I’ve known before, I met many of my friends I haven’t expected to see there, I had an opportunity to commit new friendships and get closer to the various issues seemed (primarily) to be very fresh to me. I’m getting totally involved in idea of TEDxes 🙂 I’m appreciate to the people who invented , orgnised and realised that great event. And,of course, I want more…”

 

“I really liked it. Everything was great: inspired and inspiring speakers, themes, networking and organization (especially time management, one of the hardest parts of such event). I appreciate how much efforts were spent in order to achieve this *high* level. As for me personally, I met new people, and this is really valuable.

“It is new and fresh. Some great speakers. An amazing ending. After being at TEDx Kazimierz I already started recommending this event. I am looking forward for the next edition and I would love to be a more active member of TEDx Kaziemierz community.

“It was simply awesome, great ppl, a lot of inspirational talks, opportunity to spend my time among interesting people and learn a little about their work.”

“I liked the whole experience. The speeches were motivating and inspiring.:”

“It was a nice friendly, local event.

“Because this was amazing, inspire, unforgettable event and I met there many awesome people “

“I found talks very interesting esp. of prof. Narębski will be memorable.

 

 

“Interesting speeches, good ambience, nice and open people”

“I loved the very intimate feel of the event. The speakers were well chosen and the musical parts before breaks were very thoughtful”

24th June 2015

I needed this transcript for another article I was writing, so here it is. It’s well worth sharing,

The 4.30 second talk was so much talked about that he was interviewed about it for example by an American chat show host Ellen.

Richard Lucas

Ashton Kutcher @ Teen Choice Awards

Host “here’s to my Friend and the Ulitmate Teenage choice award  recipient  Ashton Kutcher”

Ashton Kutcher

“What’s up? Oh wow. Okay okay, let’s be brutally honest — this is the old guy award, this is like the grandpa award and after this I gotta go to the geriatric home. Um, First of all, um, I don’t have a career without you guys. I don’t getta do any of the things I getta do without you. Um you know, I thought that uh, it might be interesting.. You know In Hollywood and in the industry and the stuff we do, there’s a lot of like insider secrets to keeping your career going, and a lot of insider secrets to making things tick. And I feel like a fraud.
My name is actually not even Ashton. Ashton is my middle name. My first name’s Chris. It always has been. It got changed when I was like 19 and I became an actor, but there are some really amazing things that I learned when I was Chris, and I wanted to share those things with you guys because I think it’s helped me be here today. So, it’s really 3 things. The first thing is about opportunity. The second thing is about being sexy. And the third thing is about living life.

So first opportunity. I believe that opportunity looks a lot like hard work. When I was 13 I had my first job with my Dad carrying shingles up to the roof, and then I got a job washing dishes at a restaurant, and then I got a job in a grocery store deli, and then I got a job in a factory sweeping Cheerio dust off the ground. And I’ve never had a job in my life that I was better than. I was always just lucky to have a job, and every job I had was a stepping stone to my next job and I never quit my job until I had my next job. And so opportunities look a lot like work. Number two. Being sexy. The sexiest thing in the entire world, is being really smart. And being thoughtful. And being generous. Everything else is crap, I promise you. It’s just crap that people try to sell to you to make you feel like less, so don’t buy it. Be smart, be thoughtful, and be generous.

The third thing is something that I just re-learned when I was making this movie about Steve Jobs. And Steve Jobs said when you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way that it is, and that your life is to live your life inside the world and try not to get in too much trouble, and maybe get an education and get a job and make some money and have a family, but life can be a lot broader than that when you realize one simple thing, and that is that everything around us that we call life was made up by people who are no smarter than you, and you can build your own things, you can build your own life that other people can live in. So build a life. Don’t live one, build one. Find your opportunities, and always be sexy. I love you guys.”

Richard Lucas April 2015
Introduction
At SKK –  the company I founded and have returned to run in the last few months, – I’ve been thinking and researching our innovation processes.  When I studied economics in the 1980s at Cambridge (UK), we learned how Karl Marx argued that the four drivers of the capitalist system were competition, capital mobility, the profit motive and technological progress.  Marx was wrong about many things, and the dreadful impact of his ideas on world history is hard to overstate, but his insights about the importance of technological change to business are important. Businesses that do not innovate effectively will die.
This article is a generalised version of the concepts I am implementing at a business that is one of my most important financial assets.  Why share ? Ideas in business are only as valuable as the quality of their implementation.
Note that this article is a conversion of an internal document, and the tone and voice may be more of a manager to staff than me to my normal readership.
Tesla's 1891 Wireless transmission of power and energy demonstration

Tesla’s 1891 Wireless transmission of power and energy demonstration

Why do we need innovation ?
Keeping your ears and eyes open to internal and external information and ideas about what is going on the industries and sectors relevant to the one you work in, and thinking about them, is an activity that everyone can contribute to the company they work for.
Technological change is always about either doing what you already do better, cheaper or faster  and/or doing things that could not do before.  Both are potential sources of competitive advantage. 
The purpose of this document is describe  a generic innovation and investment process and suggest tools and  links  that may be useful and set out reasonable  expectations a leader should have of staff who want to engage  in an innovation processes.
What type of innovation are we looking for and why ?  
Innovation can increase an organisation’s chances of providing better solutions for its clients,  making clients’ organisations more successful and through so doing helping you and your organisation to prosper and grow.
By improving our internal processes and organisation innovation can make your organisation more competitive, cut  costs, avoid waste, and add more value.
There are two main types of innovation 
1 Incremental improvements to existing products, services and processes
taking out costs, doing things in new ways. These can be as obvious as improving our intranet,  sales and marketing processes, new products from suppliers. or having a thermos of hot coffee put in meeting rooms at the beginning of the day so that time is not wasted in the kitchen.
Any member of staff can make proposals, explaining how the change can cut costs, raise  revenue, increase  productivity, automate manual processes, make things better for the company  or its clients.   
2 Radical change 
in what your organisation does – offering completely new products and services, what we do and changing our business models 
Proposed radical changes  must be informed by systematic client or potential client feedback. Remember the Henry Ford warning “if we asked people what they wanted we would have given them a faster horse”. Sometimes you just “know” that clients will want something before they buy it.  
We may also come across change and innovation that impacts our clients even though we are not actively involved in the technology or other factors driving the change. Even if this is the case, it’s still good to understand our client’s situation and sharing insights can be important in developing a partner rather than vendor relationship. 
3. Innovation that impacts our clients
Sometimes we may come across a change that is important for our clients. In this case it is a talking point and something that we can let our clients know about, showing that we are thinking about them, leading to a conversation about what we can do for them.  
Where can we get information and ideas about innovation
workshops/ brainstorming
benchmarking against external vendors
talking to clients about their problems
thinking
research
monitoring the external world with tools and processes.
There are many tools for keeping up with what is going on in companies, sectors and the news. We can all do Google searches, with “Google News Alerts” the news comes to your inbox.  Google Alerts https://www.google.com/alerts
As someone living and working in a  non English language environment, I cannot underline strongly enough the importance of understanding and using English. You cannot search in every language, but with English being the world’s second language of choice – > the chances of finding out something new in English are way above those in most languages.
Magazines, websites, radio shows and podcasts, industry portals, trade associations, reports,  clients, competitors, vendors, media,(web,  media)   conferences, internal existing projects,
What should the process be for an employee when he or she come across an innovation that is relevant to the company ? or has a suggestion of a new vendor partner or supplier ?
Make a Google Form and distribute the link to your organisation (and selected partners). Ask obvious questions – What Who Why,
Innovation form

Innovation form

Make sure that nominated managers have nominations on their agenda for regular meetings, get more information from anyone with an important idea or major proposal for change. and give feedback to the person with the idea. If merited, project teams can be formed to do further research, and get feedback from clients. 
Conclusion
In a small company, a founder or CEO may “do” innovation by him- or herself. In a  larger company it may be in the hands of a Product Manager. In a good company innovation  is for everyone. and it is a senior management responsibility to make sure that suggestions are responded to. Companies that do not innovate effectively have a serious problem, and may die.

April 2015

I got a call from a journalist Jerzy Sadecki interested in my investment in Lovekrakow.pl,  a news website with stellar traffic. I don’t know how much of  my answers will be published, so am posting the correspondence below.

hi

Answers in the text below.

I’m giving you the right to non exclusive right to publish this. I’ll also be publishing on my blog, I translated your questions, you can translate my answers if you like.  would you like to write an article on Lovekrakow too?  We welcome guest columnists and someone like you would be of interest to our readers.   Michal and Patryk are in charge so the final editorial decision would be theirs.  We considered an article from my brother Edward Lucas who writes in international as well as Polish media and you may have heard of. Please send me a link to your the article when it goes to press. Cheers

Richard
Szanowny Panie,

Jestem krakowskim dziennikarzem (szczegóły o mnie znajdzie Pan na wikipedii)
Miesięcznik branżowy “Press” zainteresował się działalnością i pozycją portalu LoveKrakow.pl

i zamówił u mnie tekst o nim  na tle rynku lokalnych portali w mieście.
Zbierając materiały zauważyłem , że nie tylko jest Pan  wielkim propagatorem innowacji, start upów,  TDX ect , ale włączył się Pan również w portal LoveKraków.pl, bedąc udziałowcem wydającej go spólki. Stąd moje pytania:

RL translation 
Dear Sir
I’m a Krakow journalist and you can read about me in Wikipedia , the Monthly “Press” is interested in the Lovekrakow.pl portal.  and asked me to write an article about local portals in Krakow, In my research I noticed that you are not only a  supporter of Startups and innovation, TEDxs, but that you also are a shareholder in Lovekrakow.pl, so here are some questions
1. Dlaczego zdecydował się Pan wesprzeć portal swoja osobą i pieniędzmi ? Why did I invest my money and reputation?
Because I thought it was a good idea with potential. Media is moving onto the web.  LoveKrakow is part of this trend. Michal and his team were committed and full of energy. They showed me that want to create new media in Krakow, which will be independent and what is more important – with ambition and energy.  Actually I put very little time into the project. Sometimes I make suggestions. I am a small shareholder.
2. Jaką, Pana zdaniem,  ma on odgrywać  rolę w Krakowie? What role does the website play in Krakow?
It is an information portal, that writes about what’s going on in the city, independent from traditional media
3. Czy spełnia Pana oczekiwania? Does it meet my expectations?
More than ->  The  traffic is very impressive: http://www.similarweb.com/website/lovekrakow.pl. It must be doing something right.
4. Czy wypełnia jakąś luke na rynku . Does it meet a gap in the market?
Yes – I think so.
5. Jak widzi  Pan jego przyszłość What about the future of Lovekrakow?
We have plenty of ideas about how to make more revenue, for now the focus is building  the readership – giving them access to information that is not necessarily available elsewhere. with high volumes of readers, we will find ways to monetise when we are ready. 

2015-04-10 18:27 GMT+02:00 Jerzy Sadecki <jerzy.sadecki….com>:

Szanowny Panie,

Jestem krakowskim dziennikarzem (szczegóły o mnie znajdzie Pan na wikipedii)

Miesięcznik branżowy “Press” zainteresował się działalnością i pozycją portalu LoveKrakow.pl

i zamówił u mnie tekst o nim  na tle rynku lokalnych portali w mieście.

Zbierając materiały zauważyłem , że nie tylko jest Pan  wielkim propagatorem innowacji, start upów,  TDX ect , ale włączył się Pan również w portal LoveKraków.pl, bedąc udziałowcem wydającej go spólki.
Stąd moje pytania:
1. Dlaczego zdecydował się Pan wesprzeć portal swoja osobą i pieniędzmi ?
2. Jaką, Pana zdaniem,  ma on odgrywać  rolę w Krakowie?
3. Czy spełnia Pana oczekiwania?
4. Czy wypełnia jakąś luke na rynku
5. Jak widzi  Pan jego przyszłość
Będę wdzieczny za pilną odpowiedź.

Jerzy Sadecki